Daniel Henning
Assistant Professor
Department of Emergency Medicine
Sites of Practice: 
Harborview Medical Center
University of Washington Medical Center
University of Washington Medical Center - Northwest

Faculty Information

Biography

Dr. Henning is an emergency physician, caring for patients in the Emergency Departments at both Harborview Medical Center and University of Washington Medical Center. He strives to improve the care of Emergency Department patients by improving the clinical evaluation in the early stages of care.

Dr. Henning studies early decision making in time-dependent critical diseases, such as sepsis and acute kidney injury.  He is interested in optimizing the clinical evaluation and identifying opportunities to improve diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in these diseases.  In particular, he enjoys evaluating the ability of novel tests in addressing uncertainty in decision making. He receives funding from the Centers for Disease Control and Medic One Foundation.

Education & Training: 
MD
University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine
2009
Harvard Affiliated Emergency Medicine Residency
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
2012
Research Fellowship
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
2014
MPH
Harvard School of Public Health
2014
Contact
Mailing Address: 

Harborview Medical Center
Box 359702
325 Ninth Avenue
Seattle WA 98104-2499

Research & Clinical Interests
Research Interests: 

Sepsis

Acute Kidney Injury

Shock Differentiation

Resuscitation

Active Grants:

  1. Medic One Foundation
  2. Centers for Disease Control
Clinical Interests: 

Critical Illness

Publications
Publications: 

See below for recent publications:

  1. Day DE, Oedorf K, Novack V, Sanchez LD, Wolfe RE, Shapiro NI, Henning DJ. Assessing the potential for inflammatory and endothelial biomarkers to aid in differentiating infectious from non-infectious causes of abnormal vital signs in the emergency department. Shock. 2015 Sep; 44(3): 215-20.
  2. Henning DJ, Oedorf K, Day DE, Redfield CS, Huguenel CJ, Roberts JC, Sanchez LD, Wolfe WE, Shapiro NI. Predicting adverse outcomes after admission in emergency department patients exhibiting abnormal vital signs without shock. Western Journal of Emergency Medicine. 2015 Dec; 16(7):1059-66.
  3. Henning DJ, Carey JR, Oedorf K, Day DE, Redfield CS, Huguenel CJ, Roberts JC, Sanchez LD, Wolfe RE, Shapiro NI. Assessing the predictive value of clinical factors used to determine the presence of sepsis causing shock in the emergency department. SHOCK. 2016 Jul; 46(1) 27-32.
  4. Henning DJ, Carey JR, Oedorf K, Day DE, Redfield CS, Huguenel CJ, Roberts JC, Sanchez LD, Wolfe RE, Shapiro NI. The absence of fever is associated with higher mortality and decreased antibiotic and intravenous fluid administration in emergency department patients with suspected septic shock. Crit Care Med. 2017 Mar 22. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000002311 (Epub ahead of print)
  5. Henning DJ, Puskarich MA, Self WH, Howell MD, Donnino MW, Yealy DM, Jones AE, Shapiro NI. An Emergency Department validation of the SEP-3 Sepsis and Septic Shock definitions. 2017 Mar 2. pii: S0196-0644(17)30023-9. doi: 10.1016/j.annemergmed.2017.01.008. [Epub ahead of print]