Research

Dr. Nathan White
Dr. Nathan White

Dr. Nathan White, Associate Professor and Vice Chair of Research, has received DoD funding for two of his projects. The projects are titled "An Intravenous Polymer Hemostat for Noncompressible Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury," and "A Novel Endovascular Approach for Treatment of Noncompressible Truncal Hemorrhage."

The first study, a collaboration with Suzie Pun and Drew Sellers in the UW Department of Bioengineering, directly addresses the focus area “Innovative and novel technologies that can stop life-threatening bleeding in the torso region of patients who are delayed in receiving definitive surgical care.” The goal of this project is to test the effect of a novel intravenous hemostatic biopolymer on noncompressible truncal hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury in experimental models. This project seeks to test its effects on critical aspects of the pathophysiology of polytrauma, including traumatic brain injury, blood loss, and resuscitation during simulated tactical combat casualty care. Results will be used to guide further development of the biopolymer for translation to human use within the next 5-10 years and will ultimately benefit service members and the public by providing a new and improved therapy for TBI and severe trauma casualties.

The second study, "A Novel Endovascular Approach for Treatment of Noncompressible Truncal Hemorrhage," is also a collaboration with Suzie Pun in Bioengineering as well as Wayne Monsky, Chief of Interventional Radiology at HMC. The study directly addresses the focus area “Innovative and novel technologies that can stop life-threatening bleeding in the torso region of patients who are delayed in receiving definitive surgical care.” The goal of this project is to test the effect of a novel simplified endovascular approach to noncompressible truncal hemorrhage by infusing hemostats directly into the aorta using experimental models. This project seeks to test its effects on critical aspects of the pathophysiology of noncompressible truncal hemorrhage, REBOA, and resuscitation during simulated tactical combat casualty care. Results will be used to guide further development of the endovascular approach for translation to human use within the next 5-10 years and will ultimately benefit service members and the public by providing a new and improved therapy for severe trauma casualties.