The Emergency Ultrasound faculty members in the Department of Emergency Medicine are very active in clinical research relevant to point-of-care-ultrasound (POCUS) in emergency practice. Our research endeavors generally fall within one or more of the following broad categories: assessing the effectiveness and feasibility of novel ultrasound technology, techniques, and applications; implementation of POCUS in global health; and POCUS in medical student and resident education.

Point of Care Ultrasound (POCUS)

Drs. Adeyinka Adedipe, Brandon Backlund, Kennedy Hall, Sachita Shah, and Michael Vrablik work collaboratively on a number of research endeavors exploring various facets of Emergency Ultrasound. Our research endeavors generally fall within one or more of the following broad categories: assessing the effectiveness and feasibility of novel ultrasound technology, techniques, and applications; implementation of POCUS in global health; and POCUS in medical student and resident education.

Dr. Adeyinka Adedipe’s current research activities include an investigation of a new type of ultrasound probe to assist with the placement of subclavian central venous catheters under ultrasound guidance, and an adhesive noninvasive monitor that can be used during cardiac arrest to assess blood flow.

Dr. Brandon Backlund is currently exploring factors determining the survival of ultrasound guided intravenous (IV) catheters placed in the emergency department for difficult IV access patients, and assessing a method of measuring change in the optic nerve sheath diameter via ultrasound in a traumatic brain injury model.

Dr. Kennedy Hall is developing ultrasound technology that may be used to dislodge kidney stones in vivo, and is the site investigator for a multicenter study assessing ultrasound measurement of the tricuspid annulus plane systolic excursion (TAPSE) for pulmonary embolism.

Dr. Sachita Shah’s research work combines global health, education, and POCUS.  Her publications have included work assessing a curriculum to teach POCUS to non-physician clinicians, and investigating barriers to implementation of POCUS in resource-limited international settings.

Dr. Michael Vrablik is investigating the effectiveness of ultrasound guided forearm nerve blocks for upper extremity blast injury.  He is also a co-investigator with Dr. Hall in the TAPSE study for pulmonary embolism.